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Published in History & Culture, Literature & Language, Poetry Analysis

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Published in History & Culture, Literature & Language, Poetry Analysis

on

Sergei Yesenin: To die, in this life, is not new, And living’s no newer, of course.

“Sergei Yesenin proved that despite having bad habits (heavy drinking and outburst publicly), his soul was clean. When any man tired of living human life and want to go away from depression, die is not new. All that defined in his last poem before he committed suicide.” His full name was Sergei Yesenin (b. 3 Oct, 1895 –d. 28 Dec ...

“Sergei Yesenin proved that despite having bad habits (heavy drinking and outburst publicly), his soul was clean. When any man tired of living human life and want to go away from depression, die is not new. All that defined in his last poem before he committed suicide.”


Young Yesenin in 1912

His full name was Sergei Yesenin (b. 3 Oct, 1895 –d. 28 Dec 1925) was a popular poet of 20s from Russia. Even with his writings, he was a kind of guy who could light up the room by his appearance and impressive nature of his style. Moreover, this was the man that lady could easily arouse by his presence. However, being a constant drinker and outburst publicly was his regular nature.
At the age of 19, he published his first poetry book “Beryoza” (The Birch Tree) in 1914 was popular among the children. The poetry lover used to described him as “A Gem of a peasant poet”.
Below, the last poem of Yesenin was written with his blood before he hanged himself (his death story is not true nor confirmed as a suicide recital).

Farewell, my good friend, farewell.
In my heart, forever, you’ll stay.
May the fated parting foretell
That again we’ll meet up someday.
Let no words, no handshakes ensue,
No saddened brows in remorse, –
To die, in this life, is not new,
And living’s no newer, of course.

Still, his one of the poems tells us how a young woman of a village in mid-summer gives birth to a baby. It travels to emotion that awaken us into a series of joyous feelings. Also, this poem had written in 1912 and was translated into English in 1982

Poem: "Barefoot" by Sergei Yesenin

Barefoot on Midsummer Eve in the forest yonder
Mother went with skirt tucked up in the dew to wander.
Her bare feet were stung by herbs blessed with magic power,
In the meadow grass she wept, painful was that hour.
Suddenly, she cried aloud, pain her body shaking,
Down she lay and on the spot gave birth to a baby.
I was born to sound of song, meadow grass tucked around me.
In a rainbow bright the sun every morning bound me.
Child of rural summer rites I grew wiser, bolder.
Magic-making eventide happiness foretold me […]

The suicide story of Yesenin is still an unsolved matter of conflict. His work was banned in the country for many years.

Also, Read Poem: “If You Were One Inches Long” By Shel Silverstein and Melancholy Life: Amy Levy Couldn’t Survive “Double D” War

Join us in celebrating the power of #storytelling