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Published in History & Culture, Literature & Language, Poetry Analysis

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Published in History & Culture, Literature & Language, Poetry Analysis

on

Poetry of Edna St Vincent Millay taught us Growing old is dying young

Sentiment and feminine women of 19th century of America. Edna St Vincent Millay (b. 22 Feb 1892 — d. 19 Oct 1950) earned gold badge for poetry when she was 14 and became a famous poet at 15 along with increasing her several flummoxed romantic relationship with men and women during her college years.

Poetry of Edna St Vincent Millay says through her poetry that drives man's brain in conclusion. Stating that how growing old helps to die young. To learn, read her poem, “To A Poet That Died Young”.

Close up of Edna

Edna St Vincent Millay (b. 22 Feb 1892 — d. 19 Oct 1950) earned a gold badge for poetry when she was 14 and became a well-known poet at 15 along with increasing her several flummoxed romantic relationship with men and women during her college years.

One of the famous figures of Greenwich Village and prominent poet from Sonnets. The smart and intelligent Millay had called herself Nancy Boyd and refused many proposals of publishing her work with her real name. She was not less than any celebrity in 1920, and used to appear in newspapers and magazines.
In the year 1923 she had received a Pulitzer Price for her contribution in literature.

The House of Millay

Her brilliancy in literature anyone could guess from her below poem. Learn how “growing old is dying young” from the below poem.

Edna St Vincent Millay Poem: “To A Poet That Died Young”

Minstrel, what have you to do
With this man that, after you,
Sharing not your happy fate,
Sat as England's Laureate?
Vainly, in these iron days,
Strives the poet in your praise,
Minstrel, by whose singing side
Beauty walked, until you died.
Still, though none should hark again,
Drones the blue-fly in the pane,
Thickly crusts the blackest moss,
Blows the rose its musk across,
Floats the boat that is forgot
None the less to Camelot.
Many a bard's untimely death
Lends unto his verses breath;
Here's a song was never sung:
Growing old is dying young.
Minstrel, what is this to you:
That a man you never knew,
When your grave was far and green,
Sat and gossiped with a queen?
Thalia knows how rare a thing
Is it, to grow old and sing;
When a brown and tepid tide
Closes in on every side.
Who shall say if Shelley's gold
Had withstood it to grow old?

Before Edna's advice in her above poem, starts with a question and gist quite impressive. However, it takes us through a series of thoughts. Growing old is dying young gives us feelings of who look at your photo and who will talk about you and your good stories. The poetry of st Edna Vincent Millay is remarkable and evergreen.

Join us in celebrating the power of #storytelling