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Published in History & Culture, Literature & Language, Poetry Analysis

on

Published in History & Culture, Literature & Language, Poetry Analysis

on

Kipling’s Poem: “The White Man’s Burden” on colonial control

The English journalist Joseph Rudyard Kipling (b. 30 Dec 1865 — d. 18 Jan 1936) was an Indian-born, renowned writer of the United Kingdom. His poetry explores and travel the readers back in 1899, the war between Americans and Filipinos. Moreover, the poem dig down racist behaviours toward non-white. The poem was written in the same year 1899. The fight ...

The English journalist Joseph Rudyard Kipling (b. 30 Dec 1865 — d. 18 Jan 1936) was an Indian-born, renowned writer of the United Kingdom. His poetry explores and travel the readers back in 1899, the war between Americans and Filipinos. Moreover, the poem dig down racist behaviours toward non-white. The poem was written in the same year 1899. The fight lasted for three years. In the poem “The White Man’s Burden” Kipling well elaborate this piece of poetry of war and social inequality.
The most famous expression of literature of the western world and colonialist whim over Filipinos were expressed here. It was an effort to persuade the United States to join the empirical club and seize the Philippines.
The eagerness of Rudyard and his effort seems touching the readers on urging the Americans.
The war had begun on 4th Feb 1899 two days ago the US Senate accepted the treaty. More than 4000 American soldiers were died. And on the other hand, over 20,000 Filipino fighters were down. The loss of the Philippines were more, almost 200,000 civilians died in the war due to violence, famine and disease. The battle was occurred at Manila Bay.

Poem: “The White Man's Burdenby Rudyard Kipling

 Take up the White Man's burden —
Send forth the best ye breed -
Go bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait in heavy harness
On fluttered folk and wild -
Your new-caught sullen peoples,
Half devil and half child.
 Take up the White Man's burden -
In patience to abide
To veil the threat of terror
And check the show of pride;
By open speech and simple,
A hundred times made plain,
To seek another's profit,
And work another's gain.
 Take up the White Man's burden -
The savage wars of peace -
Fill full the mouth of famine
And bid the sickness cease;
And when your goal is nearest
The end for others sought,
Watch Sloth and heathen Folly
Bring all your hopes to nought.
 Take up the White Man's burden -
No tawdry rule of kings,
But toil of serf and sweeper -
The tale of common things.
The ports ye shall not enter,
The roads ye shall not tread,
Go make them with your living,
And mark them with your dead!
 Take up the White Man's burden -
And reap his old reward,
The blame of those ye better,
The hate of those ye guard -
The cry of hosts ye humour
(Ah slowly !) towards the light:-
“Why brought ye us from bondage,
“Our loved Egyptian night?”
 Take up the White Man's burden -
Ye dare not stoop to less -
Nor call too loud on Freedom
To cloak your weariness;
By all ye cry or whisper,
By all ye leave or do,
The silent sullen peoples
Shall weigh your Gods and you.
 Take up the White Man's burden -
Have done with childish days -
The lightly proffered laurel,
The easy, ungrudged praise.
Comes now, to search your manhood
Through all the thankless years,
Cold-edged with dear-bought wisdom,
The judgement of your peers. 

Joseph Rudyard Kipling

You may also like Poem: Soul” by Marsha P Johnson on equality and Karma and Poem: “My Native Land” by Dashdorjiin Natsagdorj is whose poem not only talks about patriotism but also shows unending love for his motherland.

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